Turkey Bacon Vs. Pork Bacon: Pros & Cons.

This picture actually makes my mouth water.

No shocker here: Pork bacon isn’t particularly healthy.

Elsewhere in the world, pork bacon is usually cut from the back or sides of the pig. In the United States, it’s often cut from the belly as it contains less meat, but more fat and flavor. The meat is then cured using large quantities of salt. Needless to say, it’s far from a healthy choice.

Because of bacon’s bad reputation, many people opt for turkey bacon as a more nutritional alternative. Sure, it’s not as tasty – but it’s healthier. Right?

Not always. Turns out, the nutrition information in turkey bacon varies greatly from brand to brand. Some brands of turkey bacon have just as much fat – and even more sodium – than traditional pork bacon.

If you’re selecting pork bacon, opt for thin slices from a lean cut of the pig. Look for lots of red in the bacon (that’s the meat) and less white (that’s the fat). Most importantly, read the nutrition information. Thin and lean slices of bacon can have as little as 60 calories per slice and only 1.5 grams of fat.

If turkey bacon is your preference, compare the nutrition information to the pork alternatives. Some brands of turkey bacon can have as little as 20 calories per slice and zero grams of fat – but read carefully. And pay special attention to the sodium!

The verdict: Turkey bacon can be a healthier alternative to pork bacon, but it really varies from brand to brand! To make a wise choice for your health and body, you must compare the nutrition information.

About Davey Wavey

Davey Wavey is a certified personal trainer and YouTube sensation with more than 100 million video views. For Davey's fitness tips and secrets, sign up for his free monthly newsletter - or download any of his affordable and effective workout programs.

Comments

  1. Bacon manufacturers are very clever about hiding the fat in their bacon on the shelves. They make visible the lean meaty part in the clear plastic window, then hide all the fat behind the opaque paper so you can’t see it.

    Because of this, I’m not always able to see if the bacon is lean through the packaging. But as Davey suggests, reading the label is usually your best bet.

  2. I usually buy thick cut bacon from the meat counter. I can see the leaness or fatness easily. I have one slice cooked crispy with one poached egg and one slice of toast and fresh fruit.

  3. Davey – do you have a brand that you have used that you suggest over others?

  4. Kristina says:

    Davey, time to go vegan ;)

    • He’s rather live in the real world, I’m sure.

      • At one point he did have an animal equality page as a featured like on his facebook page. It couldn’t have been on there too long, the next time I tried to find that page through him, it was no longer on his likes. I think he must have found it too difficult to resist good food. :P

  5. christopher says:

    if turkey bacon is smoke cured that might increase the amount of sodium.in any case i wouldnt try either.yesterdays news on red meat should be pause for some serious thought on red meat.

  6. Also watch out when you read the label of turkey bacon. Most pork is for 2 slices but the turkey is for one pc. on several of the turkey brands. So is looks like less because it is and the pork bacon would be about the same if it’s label was for 1 slice.

  7. Very enlightening article on Turkey Fat.Living in a non US country we dont see much of Turkey fat so this was a real eye opener for me.Thanks Davey

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