Archive for the tag - BV

Hemp Protein Vs. Whey Protein.

HempProtein5There are a lot of different proteins out there – but hemp protein is becoming increasingly popular. Though not as psychedelic as some may hope for, hemp protein is extracted from the husked seeds of the Cannabis sativa plant. And no, it won’t make you high.

Hemp protein can be a very high-quality protein and it’s loaded with fiber (which helps you feel full longer) and heart-healthy essential omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. It also tastes great!

So how does hemp protein compare to mainstream whey protein?

Proteins are rated with a Biological Value (BV) that refers to how well and how quickly your body can actually use the protein you consume. The BV for whey protein isolate and whey protein concentrate are generally around 159 and 104 respectively. Though I couldn’t find a reliable source for the BV of hemp protein, it’s generally considered to be much lower. In other words, hemp protein is absorbed slowly by the body – making it a poor choice for post-workout recovery when your body needs nutrients quickly. On the other hand, hemp protein is a smart choice for between meals and before bed – when a slow but steady supply of protein is needed.

Hemp protein is also a great option for vegans or for individuals with lactose issues. While whey protein is derived from milk, hemp protein is free from lactose or animal products. Many hemp advocates also believe that hemp protein is considerably easier to digest and doesn’t result in the bloating or cramps sometimes associated with whey protein consumption.

The bottom line: Hemp and whey protein have different uses. Hemp is great between meals and before bed while whey protein is best after your workout. As such, one is not a substitute for the other – but both proteins are able to bring a number of great benefits to your daily nutrition plan.

5 Protein Tips for Vegan Muscles!

Dear Davey,

I’ve been trying to build muscle and I take protein shakes right after I workout, but I don’t see much of a difference. I’ve been a vegan for almost 7 years now, so I don’t get much protein.

What are some things me and your other vegan followers can eat (excluding eggs, fish, and other animals) so we can get more protein in our bodies?

Thanks,
Davis

Dear Davis,

Most Americans get more than enough protein in their diets. But for weightlifters and exercise enthusiasts, the daily requirements for protein are much higher – and thus much harder to fulfill. While most adults require only 40 – 75 grams of protein, I require 140 grams. It’s no small feat.

Getting the required amount of protein is even more difficult for vegan exercisers, as vegans eat neither animals nor animal byproducts. Meat is an easy, high-quality source of protein, and even whey protein (the highest quality protein available) is derived from dairy. For vegans, meat, dairy and whey are out of the question.

So how can exercise enthusiasts balance protein needs with a vegan diet? I asked Noel, a vegan fitness model living in NYC (pictured above). He’s so passionate about vegan fitness, he even created a YouTube channel about it. Here are his recommendations:

  1. Eat lots of nuts. 1/4 a cup of nuts can have upwards of 8 to 9 grams of decent quality protein. Noel recommends soaking the nuts, as it makes digestion and vitamin absorption easier. It’s important to opt for unsalted varieties.
  2. Get to know quinoa. 100 grams of quinoa contains some 14 grams of high-quality protein. In fact, the protein in quinoa has a higher BV rating than either beef or chicken. Though quinoa is a seed, it can be used in a variety of dishes. Here are a bunch of quinoa recipes.
  3. Stock up on oatmeal. Though you might not realize it, a cup of oatmeal has 6 grams of relatively high quality protein. The quality of the protein, though less than beef or chicken, is slightly better than fish. It’s a great way to start the day!
  4. Spread the hummus. A half cup of commercial hummus has 10 grams of protein, and it makes a great addition to a sandwich – or a condiment for fresh veggies.
  5. Almond and peanut butter. As nuts are a good source of vegan protein, it only makes sense that almond and peanut butter are also wise choices and great additions for smoothies and snacks. Typically, a serving of nut butter will have 6 – 8 grams of protein.

To Noel’s list, I’d like to add tofu – which is packed with a whopping 40 grams of protein per cup. Soybeans, soy milk and pure soy protein are also a great addition – though there has been some speculation that excess soy consumption may have negative side effects. Nonetheless, soy protein is high in quality. Lentils, tempeh, beans, brown rice and even tahini are also good and protein-rich vegan options.

For vegans, it’s especially tough to get the recommended quantities of protein to support muscular maintenance and growth – but with a little planning, it’s not only possible… but delicious!

Love,
Davey

Not All Proteins Are the Same: What You Need to Know!

We all know that proteins are the building blocks for muscles. And that we all need protein – in varying amounts – to live a healthy life and achieve our fitness goals.

For a lot of folks that live active lifestyles, protein supplements are often required to repair muscle and improve recovery time. There are as many supplements as stars in the sky, and the types of protein that these supplements contain vary from product to product. Think all proteins all basically the same? Think again.

These supplements generally contain protein sourced from milk, eggs or soy. These proteins are absorbed differently by the body; the better the absorption, the the higher the Biological Value (BV).

Here’s the BV of some common food items:

  • Whey isolate: 110-159
  • Whey concentrate: 104
  • Whole egg: 100
  • Cow’s milk: 91
  • Egg white: 88
  • Fish: 83
  • Beef: 80
  • Chicken: 79
  • Casein: 77
  • Soy: 74
  • Rice: 59
  • Wheat: 54
  • Beans: 49

Whey protein is the clear winner. Whey protein is very pure – though it’s derived from milk protein, it doesn’t contain the sugar that is otherwise found in milk protein – and it’s been proven to help boost the immune system. Unfortunately, it’s often the most expensive. And vegans won’t be able to consume it. Nonetheless, it’s the best stuff available.

The bottom line: When shopping for supplements or when adding protein to a smoothie, opt for whey protein (either concentrate, or isolate – if it’s available).