Archive for the tag - dessert

Are Vegan Desserts Healthier?

I have a sweet tooth and love dessert. When I go out with my friends, I’ve noticed that a lot of cafes and some restaurants offer vegan desserts. I’m not vegan, but I was wondering if these desserts are healthy?

From,
Liz

tart_1857Hey Liz,

If any food is vegan, it simply means that it’s made without any animal products including dairy like milk or butter. The term vegan isn’t synonymous with healthy. Just like non-vegan foods, some vegan options are healthy and some are not.

As such, not all vegan desserts are created equal.

Case in point, vegan cupcakes, cookies, cakes and pies. Just like traditional baked goods, these vegan desserts are loaded with unhealthy ingredients like corn syrup, sugar, white flour, unhealthy oils and so on. As such, these vegan baked goods aren’t a healthy choice. Instead, just like traditional baked goods, they can be a special treat – or something of which you might only eat a few bites.

On the other hand, a bowl of fresh cut fruit is both vegan and nutritious. My three ingredient cookies are also a healthy and vegan dessert choice.

The bottom line, the list of ingredients is the determining factor in whether or not a dessert is healthy – and not simply the label of vegan.

Love,Davey

 

3-Minute Healthy Watermelon Cake Recipe!

Screen Shot 2013-08-23 at 2.38.17 PMLike watermelon? Love dessert? But want something healthy?

Then I have the perfect recipe for you! Check out today’s Davey Wavey Fitness YouTube video for a delicious, nutritious, refreshing and healthy watermelon cake recipe. Best of all, it takes just three minutes to make!

Check it out!

Ice Cream Vs. Gelato Vs. Sorbet: Which is Healthiest?

With the summer heat in full swing, many of us are turning to our favorite frozen treats for dessert. But when picking between ice cream, gelato or sorbet, you’ve probably wondered which is healthiest.

Ice Cream

Ice cream has a base that includes milk, cream, sugar and typically egg yolks. The churning process incorporates air and gives the finished product its light and creamy texture. Typical ice cream has a butterfat content of 14 – 25%. Unfortunately, the cream and sugar ensure high levels of unhealthy fats, calories and simple carbohydrates.

Gelato

Though also often made with milk, sugar and egg yolks, cream isn’t an ingredient in gelato. Moreover, gelato is processed in such a way that the finished product is much denser and more flavorful than ice cream. Because gelato doesn’t include cream, it can have lower levels of unhealthy fats when compared to traditional ice cream. Unlike ice cream, butterfat content is typically in the range of 5 – 9%. However, the nutrition information can vary greatly, and some gelato varieties may have higher amounts of added sugar.

But because gelato is so dense and flavorful, many consumers find that much smaller portions satisfy – and that’s definitely an important consideration.

Sorbet

Made with neither dairy nor eggs, sorbet contains just fruit juice/syrup and water. It’s churned like ice cream and thus has a similar texture. Most sorbets are naturally fat-free and usually have less calories. However, sorbet can have considerably higher amounts of sugar than either gelato or ice cream – and, because there is no dairy, it contains less calcium.

Conclusion

When you really get down to it, none of these frozen desserts can be classified as healthy. Sorry.

Ice cream is the clear nutritional loser. In my opinion, gelato and sorbet are quite comparable. Though gelato has more fat and calories, most people will find a much smaller portion size satisfying. Sorbet doesn’t have the fat and has fewer calories, but you’ll probably eat more – and gelato has less sugar.

But if you’re really looking for something cool and healthy, take a scoop of Greek yogurt and top it with some fresh fruit.

Yonanas Product Review.

Yonanas: Worth the hype?

Last week, I made my first infomercial purchase and ordered the dessert-making sensation known as Yonanas.

Basically, it’s supposed to work like this: Put frozen bananas (along with other fruit) in the top of the Yonanas machine, and a soft-serve, ice cream-like substance comes out the bottom. You don’t add any milk, sugar, etc. – it’s an entirely banana-based dessert. And as such, it’s obviously much healthier than the ice cream or frozen yogurt alternatives.

Yesterday, my Yonanas machine arrived and I put it to the test.

While it does look and feel pretty cheap (it is only $50 plus shipping – what do you expect?), it does work. I was a bit surprised to see that an ice cream-like substance was, in fact, produced; I didn’t have high hopes.

I did discover that it takes A LOT of bananas to fill a heaping bowl as shown in the infomercials. It took 2.5 bananas to produce the amount of dessert in the photo attached to this post.

Turns out, unlike ice cream, the banana-based substance produced is very thick and dense. It’s heavy – and a half bowl is more than enough. In fact, I’m feeling something of a banana hangover today.

As far as taste goes, it’s pretty good. It does taste quite a bit like a very thick serving of frozen yogurt. And since you can add other fruits, chocolates, peanut butters, etc., into the mix – the flavor combinations are pretty much endless.

Cleanup wasn’t as simple as they’d like you to believe, but it wasn’t awful either. It took a few minutes to get everything disassembled and cleaned. It’s also dishwasher safe.

The best thing about Yonanas is saying the name. But the product does deliver, and I’m pretty content with my purchase. I won’t be eating Yonanas every night, but I think I’ll be getting some good use out of the machine.

Disclaimer: Davey Wavey was not compensated in any way, shape or form by Yonanas or their affiliates to write this product review.

5 Tips to Eat Dessert Daily and Never Get Fat.

Strength is the capacity to break a chocolate bar into four pieces with your bare hands – and then eating just one of the pieces.  ~Judith Viorst

Yeah, yeah. We all know two things:

  1. If you’re trying to lose weight or maintain a healthy weight, it’s important to keep tabs – even if it’s roughly – on the calories you consume.
  2. Desserts tend to have a shitload (that’s a technical industry term) of calories.

The Great Wall of Chocolate from P.F. Chang’s, for example, has 2,200 calories. More modest desserts in more modest portions tend to average out in the 300 calorie range (see here for a more detailed calorie listing). It’s no surprise, then, that I found the following tip posted in a fitness forum:

Limit yourself to 1 dessert per week – Go from 7 to 1 day to decrease calories by 1,800 (300 per dessert) per week. 3,500 calories burned (more than consumed) equals 1 pound.  So you can lose 1 pound every 2 weeks and 26 pounds in 1 year this one tip alone!

Talk about buzz-kill. Beyond the importance of calorie counting and the unhealthiness of most desserts, we also know another thing: Life is better with dessert. And so, dessert is one thing that I’m not willing to give up.

Don’t get me wrong: Nutrition is crucially important for a healthy lifestyle. But I refuse to subscribe to the mentality that I must deprive my taste buds of ice cream, apple crisp, pie or anything else pleasureful. Life is too short not to indulge responsibly; remember all those men and women on the Titanic that waved off the dessert tray.

If you’re like me in your unwillingness to deny your sweet tooth, then here are a few tips:

  1. Watch the portion and eat consciously. Your dessert desires can be satisfied with just a few bites. Consciously and fully enjoy each bite. You don’t need an entire pint of ice cream or thick slice of cake. It helps to put the portion on a separate plate or bowl (i.e., not eating ice cream out of the carton).
  2. Mix healthier options into your dessert selections. All desserts are not created nutritionally equally. While I’d never ask you to ditch chocolate cake entirely, occasionally opt for things like fruit salad, yogurt, mixed berries, cut mangoes or bananas drizzled in chocolate. Need more ideas? Here are some healthy dessert recipes you may want to try out.
  3. Work it off! Better and more effective than cutting calories to create a caloric deficit is to increasing the amount of calories you are burning. Starving yourself to lose weight tends to backfire. If you want to lose weight and you are unwilling to cut dessert, make it up on the treadmill. I burn 425 calories in 20 minute on the treadmill. I’d run an extra 20 minutes if it came to that or dessert!
  4. Balance it. Nutritional balance isn’t holding a cupcake in each hand. It’s eating well – most of the time. If you know that you’re going to indulge with your dessert, then cook (or order) a healthier man course. Instead of the double bacon BBQ cheeseburger at The Cheesecake Factory (6 zillion calories), order the Bang-Bang Chicken and Shrimp (only 2 zillion calories). I follow the 80/20 rule of eating healthy 80% of the time.
  5. Enjoy it. For fuck’s sake, enjoy the dessert and don’t feel guilty about it. Worst of all, don’t feel guilty about feeling guilty. Guilt is not a powerful motivator. Dessert is one of life’s simple pleasures. Eat up and enjoy.

So yes, when it comes to dessert, you can certainly have your cake and eat it to. If God didn’t want you to have chocolate, then she wouldn’t have invented it. Just indulge responsibly.

My question for you: What’s for dessert tonight? I’m having apple and pear cobbler.