Archive for the tag - fitness

What’s Your Fitness IQ?

I was reading a recent poll that suggested most Americans are vastly ignorant about health and fitness. The truth is, it really comes as no surprise as marketers are often louder than science. But how does your fitness IQ measure up? Do you have more fitness smarts than the average American?

  1. Questionpietro-boselli-sexy-teacher: About how many calories are in one pound of fat?
    a.) 1,500
    b.) 2,500
    c.) 3,500

    Answer: Though estimates range from 2,800 to 3,800, you’ll commonly that one pound of fat contains about 3,500 calories.

  2. Question: Eggs are a good source of
    a.) vitamin c
    b.) protein
    c.) fiber

    Answer: Eggs contain no fiber and no vitamin c, but do contain about 6 grams of protein each. Depending on your protein needs, that’s probably about 12% of your daily requirement.

  3. What makes you overweight?
    a.) Eating too many calories
    b.) Not exercising

    Answer: Both or either. Weight gain occurs when we consume more calories than we burn, so increasing calorie consumption and/or decreasing calorie expenditure can results in a calorie surplus.

  4. Question: How many grams of sugar are in one teaspoon?
    a.) 4
    b.) 8
    c.) 12

    Answer: Disgusting as it is, one teaspoon of sugar is equivalent to 4 grams. Since a tablespoon of ketchup has 4 grams of sugar, we know that ketchup is approximately 33% sugar. Gross.

  5. Question: What is the daily salt recommendation?
    a.) one teaspoon
    b.) two teaspoons
    c.) three teaspoons

    Answer: Most organizations recommend that we limit daily sodium intake to 1500 – 2300 mg. But those numbers are abstract and hard for most people to understand. These recommendations translate to about a single teaspoon of salt. Considering the processed foods that most people eat, a teaspoon of salt doesn’t go far.

  6. Question: Which food has the most calories?
    a.) One medium baked potato with a teaspoon of butter
    b.) One 16-ounce cup of soda
    c.) 32 pieces of candy corn
    d.) Four ounces of roasted skinless chicken breast

    Answer: With 207 calories, the answer is candy corn.

  7. Question: What is the primary fuel for sport or workout activity?
    a.) Dietary carbohydrates
    b.) Dietary fats
    c.) Protein supplementation
    d.) Dietary vitamins and minerals

    Answer: Your workouts and sports activities are powered by carbohydrates. If you go on a low carb diet, expect to get less bang for your workout buck; you’ll sell your gym results short because you’ll like the energy needed to push yourself. Your body needs carbohydrates. But instead of consuming simple carbohydrates, opt for complex carbs.

So… how did you score? If you answered any of these questions correctly, you know more than the average American. And I’m not making that up… 75% of Americans didn’t know how many calories were in a pound of fat and 65% didn’t know that eggs are a good source of protein. Let me know your score in the comments below.

P.S. And if you’re interested in taking your workout to the next level, download Davey Wavey’s Bootcamp Workout for an exercise and nutrition plan that’s designed to give you real results.

5 Fitness Habits to Drop NOW!

lift-heavy-shitGoing to the gym is a great habit to create. But not everything that people do at the gym helps to support their fitness goals.

Here are five common fitness habits that are good to break.

  1. Using the elliptical. If you’re new to the gym or have injuries that prevent you from engaging in a high intensity workout, then using the elliptical is fine. For the rest of us, let’s face it… The elliptical just doesn’t accomplish that much. The elliptical is popular because it’s easy. And although it’s better than sitting on the couch, it’s a poor substitute for something like hill sprints on a treadmill.
  2. Working out with your smartphone. Depending on your goals, you might rest for something like 30 or 60 seconds between sets. Having a smartphone in your pocket and texting during breaks will undoubtedly extend those rests and decrease the intensity of your workout. You’ll spend more time at the gym and get a less effective workout. It’s also a distraction that can make it harder to focus. Leave your phone in your locker.
  3. Getting into workout ruts. If you want to look different than you look now, you will need to do something different than you’re doing now. The biggest and most common workout rut is not changing your workout to help you progress toward your goals. If you want bigger biceps, then you’ll need to progress to heavier and heavier weights until you reach your goal. Your muscles only grow when they’re forced to grow, so constantly progress and evolve your workout to get the results you want.
  4. Holding your breath. If you don’t breath, bad things happen. As logical as this is, many people hold their breath during challenging exercises, like the bench press. Resist the urge! Breathing keeps your blood oxygenated and your body moving. Without proper breathing, exercises actually become more difficult – and you may become lightheaded or even faint. Breathe!
  5. Lifting too light. If you’re looking to increase the size of your muscles, then you’ve probably been told to aim for 10 repetitions or less. This is true. But it’s also true that your muscles should be fully fatigued on your last repetition. If you’re aiming for 10 repetitions, then you should be unable to complete to complete an 11th repetition in good form. If you can keep going, then it’s too light. Lift heavier. And keep increasing the resistance over time as your muscles become stronger to keep within your target rep range.

What are some more fitness habits worth dropping? Let me know in the comments below!

What Makes Someone Physically Fit?

Dear Davey,

Everyone talks about getting ‘fit’ but what exactly is ‘fit’ and how do you know when you have become ‘fit’? Is fitness a good BMI, fantastic looking body (like yours), low weight, being able to cycle for miles non stop or something else?

Thanks,
Jonathan

Hey Jonathan,

I love your question! And it speaks to the importance of structuring your program around a solid goal.

In the past, I’ve written about the necessity of S.M.A.R.T. goals. That is, goals that are:

  1. Specific: Goals should be laser-focused.
  2. Measurable: Whenever possible, attach real-world numbers to your goals. This could mean pounds, kilos, inches or clothing sizes.
  3. Attainable: A good goal should be achievable with hard work and dedication – but rooted in reason. Don’t make it too difficult. Conversely, don’t make it too easy.
  4. Relevant: The goal needs to be important to you. If it’s not important, you won’t stick with it.
  5. Timely: Attach a date to your goal. Rather than wanting to lose 10 pounds of fat, say that you want to lose 10 pounds of fat in 60 days.

With S.M.A.R.T. goals in mind, your question illustrates the problem of saying you’d like to become fit. For starters, it’s not specific, measurable or timely. So let’s turn “fit” into a smart goal.

body fat percentagesThough true physical fitness takes many complicated factors into consideration (such as cardiorespiratory endurance, muscle strength, muscle endurance, flexibility, balance, etc.), there is an easier way to cut to the point. It involves body fat percentages.

Here’s how it breaks down:

  • Essential fat: 10% – 13% for women, 2% – 5% for men
  • Athletes: 14% – 20% for women, 6% – 13% for men
  • Fitness: 21% – 24% for women, 14 – 17% for men
  • Average: 25% – 31% for women, 18 – 24% for men
  • Obese: 32+% for women, 25+% for men

Though body fat percentages don’t consider every aspect of physical fitness, they’re a great place to start. And it’s easy to create a smart goal around body fat percentages. For example, you could say,  “I want to achieve 15% body fat by December 31.”

With that S.M.A.R.T. goal in mind, you can certainly structure a fitness program to make it happen!

I hope that helps!

Love,
Davey

 

But when most people use the word fit, they’re referring to an in-shape individual with a low percentage of body fat.

 

4 (More) Common Workout Mistakes (And How to Fix Them)

I recently shared 4 of the most common fitness mistakes – and how to fix them. Here are 4 more common missteps and simple solutions:

  1. Mistake: Winging it. It’s a huge mistake to go to the gym without a fitness plan. Many people go to the gym and just use the equipment that is available.
    Solution: It’s important to have a goal. From your fitness goal or goals, you can create a fitness plan. You should go to the gym knowing exactly which muscle groups you’ll be working and which machines you’ll be using.
  2. Mistake: Making excuses. We can all think of excuses to skip a workout. But when you start skipping workouts, you derail your fitness plan and cheat your personal health. In order to get results, you must be consistent with your exercise schedule.
    Solution: Motivate yourself. If you don’t have enough motivation to workout regularly, educate yourself on the benefits of working out. And, educate yourself on the harm caused by a sedentary lifestyle. That should get you off your butt!
  3. Mistake: Comparing yourself to others. Many people get discouraged when they see other people lifting more weight, running faster or performing at a higher level.
    Solution: Measure yourself against no one but you! Some people have been exercising regularly for decades. Don’t let their abilities diminish the strides that you are making by becoming more active, more fit and healthier.
  4. Mistake: Favoring your favorite exercises. For most of us, our favorite exercises are the ones that we’re good at. If you don’t like an exercise, it’s probably because it’s hard for you. And if an exercise is hard, that probably means you need to be doing more of it!
    Solution: Spend more time doing the harder exercises and less time doing the easier ones. Don’t play favorites at the gym!