Archive for the tag - junk food

How To Eat Junk Food Without Feeling Guilty.

junk-food-dayToday is National Junk Food Day. Hurray! In honor of the holiday, I’m excited to share a simple, two-step strategy for enjoying junk food without the guilt.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Eat junk food.
  2. Don’t feel guilty.

Pretty easy, isn’t it? Well, there’s a catch. The problem is, most of us find it really hard to indulge in those less-than-healthy foods that we sometimes crave. Foods like pizza, macaroni and cheese, doughnuts, french fries, candy and the like.

The first step in reducing guilt is realizing that it doesn’t work in your favor. If you feel guilty about eating a slice of cake, does guilt turn that cake into lettuce? Does it burn calories? Does it motivate or inspire you? The answer is no, no and probably not. On the contrary, feeling guilty is likely to produce more emotional eating and an increasingly strained relationship with food. In other words, guilt doesn’t serve you.

We need to move beyond the label of good foods and bad foods. Some foods are healthier than others, but labeling one food as good and another as bad feeds into this downward cycle of shame and guilt. Moreover, depriving yourself of these so-called bad foods is the perfect way to trigger a binge. In my experience, that which we resist tends to persist. Resist that slice of mom’s apple pie, and if you’re anything like me, you’re probably going to spend the next three days obsessing over it. Just eat the damn slice and get over it.

Of course, the media doesn’t help. How many times do you see foods referred to as “guilt free” in recipes? How often do we project shame on people for looking a certain way or publish magazine articles that berate celebrities for gaining weight and then sell trigger-inducing ice cream ads on the next page? How often do we call skinny people “cute” and “real” for eating pizza and larger people disgusting or lazy for doing the same thing? In other words, it’s easy to see how the world around us can influence our relationship with food and our bodies.

Let’s free ourselves from the guilt. Let’s stop judging foods as bad or good. And let’s stop judging ourselves – or others – for eating those foods. Let’s enjoy the foods that we eat, whatever those foods are, and remind ourselves that it is all about balance. Sure, let’s eat healthier foods most of the time. But let’s also make room for life. And life without pizza, cake, doughnuts or french fries fucking sucks.

P.S. If you’re ready to ditch diets in favor of something that actually works, download Davey Wavey Insanely Easy Guide to Eating Smarter. It’s a meal plan that’s about more and not about less.

 

My Parents Buy Unhealthy Food – Help!

Dear Davey,

I live at home and I eat what my parents eat. Though I want to live a healthy lifestyle, my parents fill our kitchen with junk food and candy. Because I’m eating so much crap, I’m even getting a belly. How can I convince my parents to buy healthier food?

From,
Katelyn

junk-food-2Hey Katelyn,

As someone who lived at home for eighteen years, I understand your situation completely. When you’re young, you don’t necessarily have the resources to procure your own meals. But that doesn’t mean that you don’t have influence or a voice.

This much I know: One of the most important roles that any family can fulfill is support.

Sit down with your family and have a judgment-free conversation. Start with those areas of agreement. For one, your family wants you to live a long, healthy and productive life. That’s a great starting place.

Then, connect the dots. By consuming unhealthy foods, you’re increasing your risk for obesity, a shorter lifespan, heart disease and so much more. Through a healthy diet, on the other hand, you’ll be able to lose weight, enjoy more energy and even have higher self esteem. Parents can be stubborn, so explain to them why eating healthy is so important to you.

Next, present a game plan. The reality is, most people don’t understand nutrition. Many people mistakenly believe that “reduced fat” or “gluten free” foods are healthier options. That’s not necessarily the case. In other words, don’t assume that your family is informed and educated about nutrition. Take initiative by giving your family a list of foods that you’d love to have. This list may include things like fresh or frozen vegetables, unsweetened almond milk, fruits, whole wheat bread, brown rice, beans, chicken, fish, dry roasted unsalted nuts, seeds, peanut butter and so on. It’s a common misconception that healthy foods are overly expensive; be mindful of price when selecting your food choices.

Some of the responsibility falls on you. It may mean accompanying your parents to the grocery store and helping them select foods you want to eat. And just because there is unhealthy food in the house, it doesn’t mean that you need to eat it.

The reality is, diet is a personal decision and your family may not be interested in eating healthier. If your family is cooking something unhealthy, opt for a leaner variation or find an alternative. And simply by keeping healthier foods in the house, you’ll have more options when someone opens a bag of potato chips. Maybe you’ll even be able to inspire change in your family through the example you set.

Love,
Davey

P.S. For help losing weight through nutrition, exercise and an improved relationship with your body, download Davey Wavey’s Weight Loss Program.

Is It Okay to Eat Junk Food if You Exercise?

doughnutAre you the type of person who tries to justify unhealthy food choices with twisted rationale?

If so, you may have found yourself saying things like:

  • It’s okay to eat pizza tonight because I went to the gym.
  • Today was really stressful, so I deserve eating a box of chocolates.
  • I’m on vacation, so I’m going to treat myself to an extra piece of dessert.

At face value, it’s easy to see how this logic can be so convincing. And it certainly is okay to occasionally stray away from unhealthy food choices; life is about balance. But over time, these exceptions tend to become more and more frequent – and it’s easy to see how this philosophy can be a recipe for disaster.

Fear not. If you’re a junk food rationalizer, there is an easy fix. Simply untwist your logic.

Let’s look at the example of chocolates after a stressful day. If the intent is to feel better, will a box of chocolates really accomplish that? Will you feel better about yourself and your situation after loading your body with unhealthy fats and unneeded calories? Is there anything about eating chocolates that will leave you less stressed? Of course not. In actuality, you’ll probably feel even worse.

Similarly, people often tell me it’s okay for them to eat junk food because they exercise. For one, burning 300 calories at the gym doesn’t mean it’s okay to eat 1000 calories worth of doughnuts. Second, it really misses the whole point. Exercise is a way to honor your body with movement and sweat. It’s a way to improve your health and extend your longevity. In a nutshell, a healthy lifestyle helps you be the best you. There’s nothing so good about a the way a doughnut tastes that it’s worth undoing all of that.

Remember what you really, truly deserve – and then put logic to work for you.

In the comments below, share some of the ways that you try to justify unhealthy food choices.