Archive for the tag - sweating

Do Sauna Suits Help You Lose Weight?

Hi Davey,

What are your thoughts on the use of sauna suits and toning wraps while working out? Do they help you lose weight?

Regards,
Jerry

4731Hey Jerry,

Let’s dive right into it. Do sauna suits and the like help you lose weight? Yes. But not really.

First, let’s differentiate between losing weight and losing body fat. Losing weight can happen for a variety of reasons. If you become less muscular, you lose weight. Heck, if you amputate a limb, you lose weight. Losing body fat, on the other hand, is very specific. When most of us talk about losing weight, we’re really just using an inaccurate synonym for fat loss.

Having made that distinction, let’s talk about sauna suits. They’re made of waterproof fabric and cause the wearer to sweat profusely. Because the waterproof fabric blocks evaporation, the body isn’t able to cool properly. As a result, more sweat is produced.

Indeed, sauna suits will help you lose weight. But weight loss doesn’t mean fat loss. By hijacking your body’s natural cooling system through a sauna suit, you really only lose water weight. Once you rehydrate, the weight comes right back on.

It’s also worth noting that sauna suits are actually quite dangerous. After all, your body cools itself for a reason. Through excessive sweating and increases in the body’s core temperature, dehydration and heat stroke could result. In addition, there have been many reported cases of fainting, weakness and even heart attacks from sauna suits.

Love,
Davey

P.S. If you’re actually looking to decrease body fat, I recommend The Davey Wavey Weight Loss Program. Rather than gimmicks or tricks, the program is based on real science and rooted in practicality.

 

How To Prevent Swampass At The Gym.

1000x1000What is swampass? I’m so glad you asked. :-/

According to Urban Dictionary, swampass or swamp ass is the condition wherein your butt crack becomes extremely sweaty and sometimes smelly – causing your underwear and clothing to stick. In cases of extreme swamp ass, the sweat soaks all the way through your clothing and becomes visible to passersby.

Because so many of us get hot and sweaty at the gym, the risk for swamp ass is high. And for a lot of people, it becomes a source of embarrassment:

Dear Davey,

I’m new to the gym but have been going regularly for a few weeks. My workout is challenging and I sweat a ton during the exercises. By the time I’m finished with the workout, the seat of my shorts is soaked all the way through. It’s extremely embarrassing and I feel like everyone is laughing at me.

As I wrote before, sweating is actually a good thing. It helps cool your body and even can clear your skin.

The amount you sweat is controlled by genetics, diet, medications and even hormone levels. As such, diet is the only variable within your control; a diet free from processed foods (which contain high levels of salt) seems to help. For some folks, staying away from hot or spicy foods also seems to reduce sweat.

Of course, when it comes to your derriere specifically, you can try out moisture-wicking fabrics to keep things cooler (like my DirtyFit brand underwear) or even applying some powder before exercise.

And it’s also worth noting that sweat doesn’t smell. According to experts, sweat only smells when it comes in contact with certain bacteria. In other words, proactive hygiene will help keep things fresh.

Personally, as someone who sweats A LOT, my advice is to embrace your swamp ass rather than trying to eliminate it. Generally speaking, embracing your body’s natural processes is a more effective use of energy and effort than resisting them. Instead, focus on what really matters: Your workout, your goals and your results.

After all, you’re only sweating because you’re working hard… so wear that swamp ass as a badge of honor.

P.S. Speaking of sweat, try my Bootcamp Workout for a heart-pounding, muscle-pumping workout that will help create a lean, strong build!

Does Sweating More Burn More Calories?

Young athletic man taking a break during a challenging jogging outdoorLet’s talk about sweat. Steamy, hot, dripping sweat.

In fact, even as I write this blog post, I’m still sweating from my morning workout – so the topic seems more than appropriate.

Sweating is a glorious thing and it’s my secret to a clear complexion. But there’s a popular myth that sweating more means more calories burned. It’s simply untrue.

In reality, the intensity of your workout (and not the amount you sweat) determines calories burned. Sure, you may sweat more at higher levels of intensity, but sweating is largely influenced by other factors including clothing, outside temperature, body weight, genetics, diet, medications and even hormone levels.

Simply put, sweat is really just your body’s way of getting rid of heat. It isn’t necessarily an indication of workout intensity and the amount of calories or fat that you’re burning.

Some people exercise while wearing plastic “weight loss” suits during hot weather to increase sweat output. And while these suits do increase perspiration and thus result in immediate weight loss, it’s all water weight – and not the result of fat being burned. Moreover, it’s an unhealthy practice that can result in heat exhaustion.

There are few things as satisfying as a workout that leaves you dripping in sweat. But if you really want to lose weight through exercise, focus on the intensity of your workout and a calorie deficit rather than the amount of sweat that you’re producing.

I Need Help: Tips for Controlling Excessive Sweat!

Dear Davey,

I am way overweight; I’m 6’1″ and approaching 300 lbs – and it is gradually increasing.

I would really like to go to a gym regularly again, but lost interest in it after I was sick for more than two months. I know that I have to take some radical action to get my weight down and release a lot of the fat I’m holding on to.

This may sound a bit odd, but one reason I have not wanted to go to a gym again centers on a problem I have – I sweat A LOT. It doesn’t take much to get sweat flowing from my pores and all over my body. When I am at a gym, I am concerned that I am ruining the experience for other people as I tend to drip sweat on things.

I used to carry a towel to try and reduce how much this happens, but what can I do about this problem? Do you know of a way to reduce the sweating, or is there something I should be doing when at a gym and sweating on things?

A big fan,
George

Dear George,

I hear you, and your email strikes close to home. I, too, am an excessive sweater. I like to think it’s because I hit the gym hard, and exercise at 100% of my capacity. But the reality is, some of us are more prone to sweating than others.

First of all, sweating is a very good thing. It’s normal and very healthy. Not only does it help cool the body, but it cleanses your skin. In fact, sweating is my secret to a clear complexion. Some people might envy your propensity for sweating.

The amount that each of us sweats is determined by genetics, diet, medications and even hormone levels.

Of these, diet is obviously the easiest to control. Complex carbohydrates, fat and salt can all lead to increased sweating. By eating fewer processed foods (which are high in sodium), for example, you should be able to reduce the amount that you sweat. Pay attention to the nutrition labels on the food you eat. Opt for healthier options that are low in sodium. For some people, increased calcium intake and sage tea also seem to help. Also, coffee and spicy foods may lead to increased sweat production.

But fear not: Sweat doesn’t smell. It only takes on an odor when it makes contact with the bacteria on your skin. It goes without saying that good hygiene will eliminate any potentially embarrassing smells.

Some athletic apparel is designed to reduce sweating – or to wick sweat away from the body. Lululemon, for example, has shirts that are specifically designed for heavy sweaters. Of course, I still manage to sweat through them – but it does help.

Though your sweat towel may help, use a separate cloth or paper towel to disinfectant and wipe down each machine after use. Gym goers are accustomed to sweating, and they won’t be put off so long as you adhere to proper gym etiquette and hygiene. If you sweat on it, clean it off.

Moreover, I’d encourage you not to use sweat as an excuse for continuing on with your current lifestyle – even if none of these tips prove useful. All of us can find excuses not to exercise, and eliminating one often illuminates another. Stop listening to why you shouldn’t exercise, and start listening to why you should. It’s time to invest in yourself and radically improve the quality of your life.

I hope this helps.

Love,
Davey

P.S. Please help me win YouTube’s NextUp competition by following this link and clicking thumbs up next to my video! You can vote once per day through April 8 – thank you so much!