How to Preload Your Muscles.

Ever notice how the first rep of an exercise sometimes feels like the hardest? Turns out, there’s some truth to that.

When the nervous system knows that you’re about to lift a weight (i.e., you’ve just picked up a heavy barbell and are holding it in the start position), it fires to activate your muscles. It takes a time (albeit, a very short amount of time) for your muscles to be prepared with maximum output.

The term “preloading” means stimulating a muscle before you’ve contracted it. In the above example, simply holding the barbell in the start position will preload your muscles. Your biceps will be firing and you should be able contract the first repetition near maximal strength.

But not all exercises preload your muscles. Machine exercises, in particular, don’t take advantage of preloading. When performing a bicep curl on a machine, for example, you instantly go from fully relaxed to fully contracted muscles. This doesn’t give your muscles any time to preload prior to the contraction – and, as a result, you won’t be performing at optimal strength.

When using machines, slightly lift the weight with a very small range of motion. This will preload your muscles. After each repetition, don’t let the weight stack return all the way to the starting position. Doing this will help your muscles anticipate contraction – and it should make a difference in the amount of resistance you’re able to work against. And, it can help minimize cheating or comprised form.

About Davey Wavey

Davey Wavey is a certified personal trainer and YouTube sensation with more than 100 million video views. For Davey's fitness tips and secrets, sign up for his free monthly newsletter - or download any of his affordable and effective workout programs.

Comments

  1. Thanks for the great tip, Davey!

  2. Good advice, however, I always thought “shocking” your muscles when using machines was the way to go. Isn’t there something to be said for completing a rep on a machine, and releasing your muscle then quickly re-engaging? Going from relaxed to max has got to have some benefit, don’t you think?

  3. christopher says:

    i never thought about this-now i know-and i can apply this knowledge to my next workout-especially next upper body workout.sounds like a very small detail-but worth its weight in gold.how i never thought about this-but it can mean all the difference.

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