Inspiration

Fitness isn't just about what you do - it's how you think. Here's some gym-spiration to supercharge your workout.

What’s Your Fitness IQ?

I was reading a recent poll that suggested most Americans are vastly ignorant about health and fitness. The truth is, it really comes as no surprise as marketers are often louder than science. But how does your fitness IQ measure up? Do you have more fitness smarts than the average American?

  1. Questionpietro-boselli-sexy-teacher: About how many calories are in one pound of fat?
    a.) 1,500
    b.) 2,500
    c.) 3,500

    Answer: Though estimates range from 2,800 to 3,800, you’ll commonly that one pound of fat contains about 3,500 calories.

  2. Question: Eggs are a good source of
    a.) vitamin c
    b.) protein
    c.) fiber

    Answer: Eggs contain no fiber and no vitamin c, but do contain about 6 grams of protein each. Depending on your protein needs, that’s probably about 12% of your daily requirement.

  3. What makes you overweight?
    a.) Eating too many calories
    b.) Not exercising

    Answer: Both or either. Weight gain occurs when we consume more calories than we burn, so increasing calorie consumption and/or decreasing calorie expenditure can results in a calorie surplus.

  4. Question: How many grams of sugar are in one teaspoon?
    a.) 4
    b.) 8
    c.) 12

    Answer: Disgusting as it is, one teaspoon of sugar is equivalent to 4 grams. Since a tablespoon of ketchup has 4 grams of sugar, we know that ketchup is approximately 33% sugar. Gross.

  5. Question: What is the daily salt recommendation?
    a.) one teaspoon
    b.) two teaspoons
    c.) three teaspoons

    Answer: Most organizations recommend that we limit daily sodium intake to 1500 – 2300 mg. But those numbers are abstract and hard for most people to understand. These recommendations translate to about a single teaspoon of salt. Considering the processed foods that most people eat, a teaspoon of salt doesn’t go far.

  6. Question: Which food has the most calories?
    a.) One medium baked potato with a teaspoon of butter
    b.) One 16-ounce cup of soda
    c.) 32 pieces of candy corn
    d.) Four ounces of roasted skinless chicken breast

    Answer: With 207 calories, the answer is candy corn.

  7. Question: What is the primary fuel for sport or workout activity?
    a.) Dietary carbohydrates
    b.) Dietary fats
    c.) Protein supplementation
    d.) Dietary vitamins and minerals

    Answer: Your workouts and sports activities are powered by carbohydrates. If you go on a low carb diet, expect to get less bang for your workout buck; you’ll sell your gym results short because you’ll like the energy needed to push yourself. Your body needs carbohydrates. But instead of consuming simple carbohydrates, opt for complex carbs.

So… how did you score? If you answered any of these questions correctly, you know more than the average American. And I’m not making that up… 75% of Americans didn’t know how many calories were in a pound of fat and 65% didn’t know that eggs are a good source of protein. Let me know your score in the comments below.

P.S. And if you’re interested in taking your workout to the next level, download Davey Wavey’s Bootcamp Workout for an exercise and nutrition plan that’s designed to give you real results.

Gay Pride For Your Body!

gaypridebodyJust last week, I had the pleasure of attending Vancouver Pride for a video about drag queens that I’m filming. Next week, I’m off to Montreal Pride where I’ll be interviewing members of the bear community. As such, it only seems fitting to talk about pride.

As someone who has created more than a few LGBT pride-themed videos, I’m always surprised by the number of comments asking for straight pride. “If gay people have pride,” they often write, “then straight people should have a pride, too. After all, equal is equal.” And therein is where these (hopefully) well-intentioned individuals miss the point.

Of course, straight people don’t need pride. When children get bullied for being straight, then we can have a straight pride. When family members get disowned for their straightness, then we can have a straight pride. When people kill themselves for being straight, I will be the first to march in a straight pride parade. Until then, shut up and sit down. Because, as it turns out, every day is straight pride.

In a nutshell, it’s worth honoring and celebrating the victories and histories of marginalized groups like the LGBT community.

And in extending that circle outward (but also inward), our bodies are deserving of celebration, too. Though in a very different way and capacity, our bodies are also often the recipients of shaming, repression and mistreatment. Many of us have wrestled with body image issues and eating disorders; for some the struggle continues. But whether it’s our own personal journey or, in the larger sense, the arc of society in overcoming stigma or stereotyping, every step is worth celebrating.

Our bodies and our sexual orientation are two different things. The history and struggle is different. But regardless of the form it takes, pride is a powerful thing. Celebrating the journey makes the challenges softer and the victories stronger. It creates community. It builds us up. And it pushes us forward, even when the road ahead isn’t easy.

There might not be a pride parade for your body (though maybe there ought to be one). There aren’t flags to wave or parties to attend. But there is a history to honor and victories to celebrate. So in the spirit of pride, happy body pride.

 

How To Eat Junk Food Without Feeling Guilty.

junk-food-dayToday is National Junk Food Day. Hurray! In honor of the holiday, I’m excited to share a simple, two-step strategy for enjoying junk food without the guilt.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Eat junk food.
  2. Don’t feel guilty.

Pretty easy, isn’t it? Well, there’s a catch. The problem is, most of us find it really hard to indulge in those less-than-healthy foods that we sometimes crave. Foods like pizza, macaroni and cheese, doughnuts, french fries, candy and the like.

The first step in reducing guilt is realizing that it doesn’t work in your favor. If you feel guilty about eating a slice of cake, does guilt turn that cake into lettuce? Does it burn calories? Does it motivate or inspire you? The answer is no, no and probably not. On the contrary, feeling guilty is likely to produce more emotional eating and an increasingly strained relationship with food. In other words, guilt doesn’t serve you.

We need to move beyond the label of good foods and bad foods. Some foods are healthier than others, but labeling one food as good and another as bad feeds into this downward cycle of shame and guilt. Moreover, depriving yourself of these so-called bad foods is the perfect way to trigger a binge. In my experience, that which we resist tends to persist. Resist that slice of mom’s apple pie, and if you’re anything like me, you’re probably going to spend the next three days obsessing over it. Just eat the damn slice and get over it.

Of course, the media doesn’t help. How many times do you see foods referred to as “guilt free” in recipes? How often do we project shame on people for looking a certain way or publish magazine articles that berate celebrities for gaining weight and then sell trigger-inducing ice cream ads on the next page? How often do we call skinny people “cute” and “real” for eating pizza and larger people disgusting or lazy for doing the same thing? In other words, it’s easy to see how the world around us can influence our relationship with food and our bodies.

Let’s free ourselves from the guilt. Let’s stop judging foods as bad or good. And let’s stop judging ourselves – or others – for eating those foods. Let’s enjoy the foods that we eat, whatever those foods are, and remind ourselves that it is all about balance. Sure, let’s eat healthier foods most of the time. But let’s also make room for life. And life without pizza, cake, doughnuts or french fries fucking sucks.

P.S. If you’re ready to ditch diets in favor of something that actually works, download Davey Wavey Insanely Easy Guide to Eating Smarter. It’s a meal plan that’s about more and not about less.

 

Straight Skinny, But Gay Fat.

straight skinny gay fatHere’s something you’ve probably heard: Someone referred to as “straight skinny but gay fat.”

This statement, of course, refers to the differing standards in appearance for straight and gay men. In other words, a few extra pounds on a straight guy isn’t a big deal. But in the gay world, it’s a different story altogether.

Now here’s something you probably haven’t heard: Among men who have eating disorders, 42% identify as gay.

When we hear the term “gay fat” in reference to the double standard in body image, the tendency is to laugh. It’s often used as a punch line. But I’m not laughing. Maybe the idea of “gay fat” wouldn’t bother me so much if it wasn’t killing people.

Here’s something else you probably haven’t heard: Without treatment, up to 20% of people with serious eating disorders die. With treatment, that number is still 2% – 3%. Eating disorders are deadly.

Eating disorders are a real problem in our community, and we’re dismissing it as a joke.

As I’ve mentioned, I was anorexic in middle school. Growing up overweight, I tried to take control of my situation by starving myself. It was easy to outsmart the doctors when they asked about my weight loss, and even easier to deceive my own family. In fact, to this day, my mother refuses to acknowledge my eating disorder.

The reality is, it’s not easy to talk about eating disorders. And that’s especially true for men. In a world that sees eating disorders as a problem for teenage girls trying to fit into prom dresses, it’s all of our jobs to decrease the stigma and be constructive with our words and actions.

When someone is referred to as straight skinny but gay fat, I’m not laughing. Because what I really hear in that statement is the struggle that all gay men have of looking in the mirror and seeing someone they love. And to me, that’s not a joke. And if it is, it’s a punchline that some of us are paying for with our lives.

 

What Is Broscience?

thesituationWhat is broscience?

According to Urban Dictionary:

Broscience is the predominant brand of reasoning in bodybuilding circles where the anecdotal reports of jacked dudes are considered more credible than scientific research.

Need an example?

Bro, you gotta slam 40-60 grams of waxy maize plus 20 grams of BCAA within 7 seconds of finishing your last set of squat rack curls. Otherwise, you’ll go straight to catabolic.

Broscientists are everywhere, but are most likely in the free weight area of your gym, online bodybuilding forums or any local GNC. They’re smooth, fast talking and almost always have no idea what the fuck they’re talking about.

Broscience will teach you:

  1. Sleep less to increase testosterone. You’ll wake up angry and that will boost your testosterone.
  2. Flexibility is the ability to flex.
  3. Hammer curls get the girls. Pecs for sex. Trapezius for the sleaziest. And squats for thots.
  4. Peanut butter sticks to you and that’s how you put on weight.
  5. During your anabolic window, it’s important to take selfies or you’ll lose your gains.

As it turns out, exercise has been studied fairly extensively by the scientific community. If you have a question, there’s likely a corresponding, science-based study with an actual answer. And despite the popular narrative that says otherwise, there’s scientific agreement on many aspects of fitness.

So take the plunge. Say no to bro and put your reliance on science.

P.S. If you’re looking for a real, science-based plan to to increase muscle mass, download Size Matters: Davey Wavey’s Foolproof Guide to Building Muscle.