Nutrition

What you do in the kitchen is just as important as what you do in the gym. To effectively achieve your fitness goals, proper nutrition is an absolute must!

The Gay Bottom Diet.

cuddlingAlong with unicorns and leprechauns, the so-called “bottom diet” is always elusive.

I’ve been writing this blog for several years. And one of the most popular food-related questions that I get asked is about this very issue. In varying forms, the question goes something like this: What foods can I eat to ensure that I’ll be a clean bottom?

Seeing as this is a nutrition and fitness blog, I haven’t felt the need to address the issue. That is, until this morning when I came across an email from a young man in Vancouver:

I’m 21 and I pride myself as being a good bottom. That means being a clean bottom. Before I bottom, I generally avoid eating solid foods for 24-hours but was wondering if there are certain foods that I should eat more of or less of to be a better bottom?

I understand that sex doesn’t come with a manual. And that you can’t ask your mom or dad for bottoming advice. For a lot of us, gay intercourse is learned through trial and error. Lots of errors.

But in my experience there are a few things that I’ve come to learn. And here they are:

  1. No man is worth your health. Your body needs food, and starving yourself is depriving your body of the nutrients that it needs. It sacrifices your health and puts your fitness goals at risk. First and foremost, you need to treat your body with love and respect.
  2. Butt sex is shitty. The primary function of your anus and rectum is to expel feces. It’s great that we’re able to enlist the anus for a secondary, more pleasurable purpose – but know that poop can come with the territory. Your partner needs to understand this too, and thus have reasonable expectations.
  3. Being a good sex partner – top, bottom or otherwise – is about communication, respect, patience, consideration, understanding and fun. All of these things are far, far more important factors in having good sex.
  4. Using words like clean or dirty aren’t helpful. These words are loaded with shame, and they’re not conducive to a healthy and productive relationship with our bodies, with our partners or with sex in general.

Having said all of that, is there really a healthy, sustainable diet that can result in cleaner anal intercourse?

In browsing forums and discussion boards around bottoming, many commentators encourage eating more fiber. Bottoming aside, we know that 95% of Americans don’t get enough fiber – so this could be a worthwhile consideration. However, fiber comes in two forms.

Soluble fiber adds bulk to stools and is a great way for treating diarrhea. Soluble fiber also helps lower cholesterol and control blood sugar, and is found in oats, beans, potatoes, apples, mangos, berries, peaches and so on.

Insoluble fiber, on the other hand, is not digestible. It softens stools and makes diarrhea worse. It is found in the skins of fruit, the skins of beans, whole wheat, cereal products, brown rice, seeds, broccoli, spinach, carrots, tomatoes, lettuce and so on.

In other words, the type of fiber may greatly influence results. And having distinguished between the two fiber types, it’s also important to remember that foods like whole wheat, brown price, seeds and broccoli are all healthy, nourishing choices – and that they shouldn’t be avoided in your diet for the sake of sex.

At the end of the day, we are all very unique and we all process and digest foods in different ways. It’s unlikely that there’s really any magical solution to the so-called Bottom Diet. And maybe that’s a good thing. Sure, pre-intercourse preparation is important. But let’s keep our focus on what really matters: Ourselves, our partners and the connection we make.

And let’s remember that sometimes, shit happens.

P.S. If you have a fitness or nutrition question for Davey, send it to davey@daveywaveyfitness.com.

P.P.S. For an awesome at-home core workout, download Davey Wavey’s Six Pack Program and get started today.

 

Does Pasta Make You Fat?

hunkeatingpastaThere’s a quote that I love from a famous Italian-French film star in the 1960s named Sofia Loren. Famous for her talent and good looks alike, Loren once commented on her appearance by saying:

Everything you see I owe to spaghetti.

For most Americans, the word pasta is a synonym for fattening. But is there any truth to this notion – or are we missing the point all together?

The popular theory goes something like this: Pasta is really just carbohydrates. When we eat carbohydrates, they turn into sugar and get stored as fat.

The reality is a bit different. When we consume more calories than we burn, those excess calories are stored as fat. You can get fat from eating too many calories of any food, be it pasta or even spinach. Carbohydrates and protein both contain 4 calories per gram, compared to 7 calories per gram of alcohol and 9 calories per gram of fat. Relatively speaking, pasta isn’t particularly calorie dense.

We also know that pasta is a staple of the Italian diet. According to the National Pasta Association, the average Italian eats 51 pounds of pasta per year. North Americans, on the other hand, eat an average of 15 pounds annually. And yet, the obesity rate in Italy is just 10% compared to 32% in the United States. Obviously, there are other variables to consider – but one can’t but wonder if our pastaphobia is misguided.

A lot of it comes down to serving sizes. It’s worth noting that a serving of pasta is just 2 ounces. Depending on the pasta shape and configuration, that’s about 1/2 cooked cup of pasta. For Americans that are accustomed to consuming mountains of pasta, this might not seem like much. But remember that you can add pasta to a base of cooked vegetables, beans or even chicken. It’s helpful to think of pasta as an ingredient – and not the meal itself.

Americans also tend to load pasta with unhealthy, calorie-dense sauces. Instead, opt for a tomato-based sauce without added sugars. You’ll immediately and dramatically reduce your caloric intake.

And as I’ve mentioned before, carbohydrates get a bad rap of which they’re undeserving. Carbohydrates help ensure proper bodily function and improved results at the gym. Low carb diets are often associated with low energy levels, fatigue, weakness, headache and/or bowel issues. Rather than avoiding carbs altogether, one can eliminate the blood sugar spike associated with simple carbohydrates by favoring whole wheat pasta over traditional pasta.

At the end of the day, blaming pasta for our burgeoning waistlines misses the point; portion size and preparation methods are a more important consideration.

P.S. Losing weight is about more than counting calories and moving more. It’s also about transforming the relationship that you have with your body. For the last program that you’ll ever need, download The Davey Wavey Weight Loss Program.

Why I Don’t Take A Pre-Workout Supplement!

Dear Davey,

I’ve seen a lot about pre-workout supplements and my nutrition store was giving out free samples. I wanted to hear what you think of them? Are they too good to be true?

From,
Dan

marc-fitt-2Especially if you’re feeling overworked or lacking energy, it may be tempting to reach for a pre-workout supplement. Many supplement stores will have countless options promising to give your workout the edge you need.

The first thing to remember is that pre-workout supplements are not regulated by the FDA. In some ways, these supplements are still the wild west – and the long-term impacts have yet to be evaluated. In other words, proceed with caution.

There are a few ingredients that you’ll typically find in pre-workout supplements:

  • Carbohydrate sources. We know that carbs give you energy, and that they’re an important part of any pre-workout meal. Having energy to power through your workout will help enhance your results. Of course, you need not get carbohydrates from a pre-workout supplement; a banana will do the trick.
  • Caffeine. The stimulating effects of caffeine are well documented – and some exercisers believe that caffeine gives their workout an edge. While moderate caffeine consumption isn’t necessarily dangerous, keep in mind consuming caffeine before an afternoon or evening workout may impede your sleep.
  • Creatine. Generally considered to be safe, creatine has been shown to increase muscle mass and add bulk. For some people, creatine has been associated with bloating and extra water weight. Regardless, anyone interested in creatine or its benefits can experiment with the supplement independently of a pre-work.
  • L-arginine. Helping to dilate your blood vessels, this amino acid can improve blood flow during exercise. Unfortunately, it’s not necessarily healthy; some studies suggest that it increases oxidation stress and markers of aging.

As you can see, pre-workout supplements are an unregulated mixed bag of ingredients. For me, the risk isn’t worth the reward and I prefer a more holistic approach. If you eat a smart, balanced diet, there is little or no need for supplementation. And if you’re tired before exercise, listen to your body’s wisdom and change what’s causing your fatigue – rather than popping a pill or mixing a powder to treat the symptoms.

That’s my two cents.

Love,
Davey

P.S. If you want to transform the way you look and feel through the foods you eat, download Davey Wavey’s Insanely Easy Guide to Eating Smarter.

Which Is Better: Protein Supplements or Protein Foods?

Alon-Gabbay-SixPack-CamWithHim-11If you’ve ever visited a supplement store like GNC, you’ve likely seen dozens of protein products promising incredible results. But beyond the marketing hype, are these products really any better than high protein foods like fish or chicken?

It depends what you mean by better. In reality, there are advantages to both protein sources.

So let’s break things down.

Advantages of Protein Supplements:

  • Higher Biological Value (BV). BV measures how much protein is absorbed from a food and incorporated into the body, and is therefore often used to determine protein quality. Though this measure of protein usability has its limitations, there’s no doubt that protein supplements have higher BV scores than food. High BV products include:
    • Whey protein: 96+ BV
    • Chicken egg: 94 BV
    • Cow milk: 90 BV
    • Rice: 83 BV
    • Chicken: 79 BV
    • Fish: 76 BV
  • Convenience. I think the most compelling case for protein supplementation is that they’re super convenient. You can pack protein powder in your gym bag; you can’t do that with a chicken dinner. If you’re on the go or don’t have time to sit for a meal, protein supplements are a great option.
  • Easy to track. Whatever your daily protein target, supplements take out the guesswork. The protein supplement will indicate the grams of protein per scoop – so you’ll know exactly what you’re eating. Calculating protein in foods like fish, chicken or turkey can be much trickier.
  • Easier to hit your target. If you’re a serious gym enthusiast and looking to pack on some serious muscle, your target protein intake could be beyond 150 grams per day. For a lot of people, consuming that amount of protein through a traditional diet is unrealistic – and may result in overeating. With protein supplementation, it’s much easier.

Advantages of Protein Foods

  • Gastrointestinal issues. Though there are numerous protein supplement options, many people experience bloating or cramps from protein supplementation. Whey protein, for example, is derived from milk. For individuals with lactose sensitivities, this can be an issue. With high protein foods, you won’t have these concerns.
  • Satiety. A protein shake probably won’t fill you up. But a fish dinner probably will. Relying on natural protein sources through food can help keep you full longer and curb cravings.
  • Avoid crappy supplements. Let’s face it: Not all protein supplements are created equal – and there are a whole slew of products with added fillers and unhealthy ingredients. Many of the protein bars are really just glorified candy bars with chocolate, added sugar and unhealthy fats. By sticking with protein foods, you can avoid all of that.

So what’s the bottom line? Are protein supplements required for muscle growth? Absolutely not. You can certainly fuel your fitness goal through a diet of whole, real foods rather than supplements. Having said that, supplements are certainly convenient – and may be a more realistic option for the rest of us.

P.S. To learn the tricks for packing on some lean mass, download Size Matters: Davey Wavey’s Foolproof Guide to Building Muscle.

Does Skipping Meals Help Lose Weight?

tumblr_n05ae7mBOU1qmbokso1_1280There are many tricks and strategies that can help you achieve your fat loss goals, but is skipping meals one of them?

At face value, it seems to make sense. After all, we know that a calorie deficit is required for weight loss. That means consuming fewer calories than your body burns. For healthy and sustainable weight loss, most experts recommend consuming 250 – 500 fewer calories than your body burns. By skipping a meal, we can easily create that calorie deficit. Right?

It’s not that simple. Skipping a meal has other consequences.

For one, researchers have found that meal skippers tend to overeat on their next meal due to their extreme hunger. In total, they still tend to eat the same amount of calories. According to researchers, this cycle of starvation and then overindulgence can result in some potentially risky metabolic changes that, over time, could even result in diabetes.

Beyond the metabolic impact and intense hunger pangs, skipping meals and is also absolutely miserable. If you’ve ever spent time fasting, you’ve likely experienced difficulty focusing, moodiness, drops in productivity, sluggishness and so on. And if you’re lacking energy and focus, it becomes much harder to power through a workout; thus, it can put your results at risk.

Rather than skipping meals, cut calories by making your existing meals smarter and healthier. Trim down your portions and opt for more vegetables, lean meats and healthy cooking methods.

P.S. To look and feel great through the foods you eat, download Davey Wavey’s Insanely Easy Guide to Eating Smarter.