Archive for the tag - whey protein

Whey Protein BEFORE Working Out Burns Fat?

Dear Davey,

A friend of mine mentioned that eating protein before you workout is a smart idea because it burns more fat. Is there really any truth to this?

From,
Sean

Bryce Thompson by Rick Day 16Hey Sean,

Your friend is likely referring to an often-cited Michigan State University study that was published in 2009.

When we talk about protein, it’s often about the role it plays in muscle growth – and the emphasis is often on post-workout protein consumption. For example, we know that consuming whey protein after a heavy strength training workout can help improve results.

But for the aforementioned study, researchers examined the role of pre-workout protein consumption on something called resting energy expenditure (REE). REE is the amount of energy, usually expressed in food calories, required for a 24-hour period by the body during resting conditions. For many of us, this measure is especially important because it can account for 60% – 75% of your total energy expenditure. If you increase REE, you burn more total calories – and, in theory, store fewer calories as fat.

In Michigan State’s study, experienced lifters were given either a whey protein supplement or carbohydrate supplement 20 minutes before working out. After 24 and 48 hours, REE was measured and compared to the baseline. While both supplements increased REE 24 and 48 hours after the strength training session, the whey protein supplement resulted in a much higher REE at the 24-hour mark compared to either the carbohydrate supplement or the baseline.

Keep in mind, increasing REE isn’t the same as burning fat. To make a very long story short, weight loss is achieved when you consume fewer calories than you burn. REE increases calories out, but that’s only one side of the equation. And weight loss isn’t the same as fat loss. What we call weight loss is really a combination of fat and muscle loss; to minimize muscle loss, continue with a challenging strength training program.

In other words, it’s a bit more complicated than your friend implied. But there is truth to his statement. If you want to incorporate the findings of this study, consume whey protein before working out. Keep in mind, post-workout whey protein and carbohydrates are also recommended for maximized results.

Love,
Davey

P.S. For everything you need to know about losing weight, download The Davey Wavey Weight Loss Program and get started today!

Do Protein Shakes Work?

doproteinshakeswork

The packaging on many popular whey protein shakes and supplements makes them seem like miracle products. It all begs the question: Do protein shakes really work to build muscle mass? Or is it marketing hype?

As it turns out, whey protein has been extensively tested – including a 2001 study published in the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise. In the study, 36 males were divided into three groups and underwent 6 weeks of strength training. Compared to the placebo group, men who supplemented with whey protein experienced more lean muscle mass and tested higher on many strength measures.

According the Mayo Clinic, the muscle building claims of whey protein are given a score of “B” – meaning that there is good scientific evidence for this use:

Whey protein has been studied for promoting muscle growth and improving athletic performance. Taking whey protein after exercise may have benefits in both men and women, in terms of improving protein oxidation and blood levels of essential amino acids. Overall, short-term studies have suggested that whey protein increases muscle mass and strength. Some conflicting results have been found in terms of whey protein’s effects on body composition. More research is needed to confirm these results over a longer period of time.

Of course, just consuming whey protein won’t magically grow your muscles. Whey protein supplementation must be in addition to a comprehensive strength training and nutrition program that targets muscle growth. And, too much protein can be detrimental to your health.

In other words, whey protein can be a powerful tool in building lean muscle mass – but it’s just one factor of many.

 

 

Hemp Protein Vs. Whey Protein.

HempProtein5There are a lot of different proteins out there – but hemp protein is becoming increasingly popular. Though not as psychedelic as some may hope for, hemp protein is extracted from the husked seeds of the Cannabis sativa plant. And no, it won’t make you high.

Hemp protein can be a very high-quality protein and it’s loaded with fiber (which helps you feel full longer) and heart-healthy essential omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. It also tastes great!

So how does hemp protein compare to mainstream whey protein?

Proteins are rated with a Biological Value (BV) that refers to how well and how quickly your body can actually use the protein you consume. The BV for whey protein isolate and whey protein concentrate are generally around 159 and 104 respectively. Though I couldn’t find a reliable source for the BV of hemp protein, it’s generally considered to be much lower. In other words, hemp protein is absorbed slowly by the body – making it a poor choice for post-workout recovery when your body needs nutrients quickly. On the other hand, hemp protein is a smart choice for between meals and before bed – when a slow but steady supply of protein is needed.

Hemp protein is also a great option for vegans or for individuals with lactose issues. While whey protein is derived from milk, hemp protein is free from lactose or animal products. Many hemp advocates also believe that hemp protein is considerably easier to digest and doesn’t result in the bloating or cramps sometimes associated with whey protein consumption.

The bottom line: Hemp and whey protein have different uses. Hemp is great between meals and before bed while whey protein is best after your workout. As such, one is not a substitute for the other – but both proteins are able to bring a number of great benefits to your daily nutrition plan.

Does Whey Protein Make You Lose Weight?

picking-protein-scoopAfter you’ve finished a grueling workout, your body needs protein – and it needs it fast. When it comes to speed, nothing beats whey protein. Because it’s absorbed so quickly into your system, it has become a popular post-workout snack.

Other types of protein like soy or casein can also be effective, but they’re absorbed slowly over time. As such, they’re better choices for general protein supplementation or take before going to bed.

But a study by the USDA takes things a step further. For the study, overweight and obese individuals were divided into various groups. One of the groups was given 56 grams of whey protein per day while another group was given 56 grams of soy protein. The proteins were ingested through smoothies given twice daily.

Beyond the protein supplementation, the participants were given no nutrition advice and were allowed to eat whatever else they wanted.

Approximately six months later, researchers found that the whey protein group had lost both weight and body fat relative to other groups – and that their waist was nearly an inch smaller compared to the soy protein group. Participants in the whey group also showed lower levels of the hunger-stimulating hormone ghrelin.

Because participants had lower levels of ghrelin, researchers speculate that whey protein may lead to increased satiety. In other words, including whey protein as part of your diet – in addition to fueling your muscles – may help curb your appetite.

While more research is needed to further understand the connection between whey, hunger and weight loss, it seems that whey protein could play an important role in weight management.

Which Protein is Best to Take at Night?

Muscles like these need are built by protein - but not all protein sources and supplements are created equal.

We know that protein is essential for muscle growth – and that not all types of protein are created equal. If you go to a nutrition store, you’ll see protein supplement varieties including whey concentrate, whey isolates, casein, soy, etc. Moreover, protein can be found naturally in foods like meat, fish, eggs, nuts and more.

So, which type of protein is best to take at night or before bed?

Each type of protein has it’s advantages. For example, whey isolates are a good value and very quick to be absorbed by the body. For this reason, they’re a great post-workout protein source when your body needs nutrients quickly. But when considering a protein to consume before bed, you’ll want something that will be absorbed slowly throughout the night.

Casein protein is the best slow-digesting protein – and it’s the perfect protein supplement to take before bed. Since casein takes anywhere from 5 – 8 hours to fully breakdown, you’ll fuel your body and your muscles throughout the night. Casein is derived from milk, so it may not be suitable for individuals with lactose sensitivities – and it’s not vegan.

Most bodybuilders or athletes get their casein as a powdered protein from nutrition stores. But, if you prefer, casein can be found naturally in foods like milk, cheese and cottage cheese. A single cup of cottage cheese, for example, can have 30 grams of protein – and much of it is casein.

Keep in mind, you can slow the absorption of non-casein proteins by combining them with foods that are slow to digest. Foods that are rich in fat or fiber take much longer to digest. Making a peanut-butter and soy protein/soy milk shake, for example, will result in a suitable nighttime alternative for vegans or people with lactose sensitivities.

The bottom line: When it comes to nighttime protein consumption, casein is king.

Protein Shakes and Farting: The Smelly Truth.

No one likes to talk about it, but flatulence (i.e., farting) is a common side effect of protein shakes and powders. More than just stinky, it can be both embarrassing and uncomfortable. So what can be done about it?

First and foremost, protein (depending on it’s source, quality, etc.) can be harder for your body to break down and digest. For some people, gas and bloating is the result. However, there are a few questions you can ask yourself to help find a protein supplement that results in the lowest amount of flatulence possible.

Do I even need protein powder or shakes? This question is paramount because most Americans already get more than enough protein from their diets. Protein supplementation is necessary only if your diet isn’t providing you with the protein your body needs. Generally, this is the case for athletes, bodybuilders, power-lifters and other heavy exercisers. Calculate your protein requirement; you may be able to eliminate protein supplementation – and the subsequent flatulence – altogether.

Am I lactose intolerant? Whey protein is great for building muscle, but it’s derived from milk. According to the Whey Protein Institute:

Individuals with lactose intolerance should select a pure whey protein isolate, which has less than 0.1 gram of lactose per tablespoon (20 grams). Research has shown that most people with lactose intolerance have no trouble taking this very small amount of lactose. Individuals with lactose intolerance should avoid whey protein concentrates as they usually contain lactose and the amount can vary greatly from product to product.

Alternatively, people with lactose issues may want to experiment with other protein types such as soy or hemp – though these are generally considered less effective for supporting muscle growth.

Is my protein high quality? Not all protein powders are the same. Many lower-quality options contain fillers to enhance flavor or taste. Unfortunately, they can also cause bloating or gas. And some types of protein are more digestible than others. If your current protein supplement is causing excessive gas, shop around for a new brand. It’s about finding a high quality and digestible protein that works for you.

The bottom line: Unfortunately, there’s no magic bullet to reduce protein-induced flatulence. But with a little trial and error, you should be able to find a protein supplement that meets your body’s needs and supports your goals without too much stinkiness.

Not All Proteins Are the Same: What You Need to Know!

We all know that proteins are the building blocks for muscles. And that we all need protein – in varying amounts – to live a healthy life and achieve our fitness goals.

For a lot of folks that live active lifestyles, protein supplements are often required to repair muscle and improve recovery time. There are as many supplements as stars in the sky, and the types of protein that these supplements contain vary from product to product. Think all proteins all basically the same? Think again.

These supplements generally contain protein sourced from milk, eggs or soy. These proteins are absorbed differently by the body; the better the absorption, the the higher the Biological Value (BV).

Here’s the BV of some common food items:

  • Whey isolate: 110-159
  • Whey concentrate: 104
  • Whole egg: 100
  • Cow’s milk: 91
  • Egg white: 88
  • Fish: 83
  • Beef: 80
  • Chicken: 79
  • Casein: 77
  • Soy: 74
  • Rice: 59
  • Wheat: 54
  • Beans: 49

Whey protein is the clear winner. Whey protein is very pure – though it’s derived from milk protein, it doesn’t contain the sugar that is otherwise found in milk protein – and it’s been proven to help boost the immune system. Unfortunately, it’s often the most expensive. And vegans won’t be able to consume it. Nonetheless, it’s the best stuff available.

The bottom line: When shopping for supplements or when adding protein to a smoothie, opt for whey protein (either concentrate, or isolate – if it’s available).